BBCTechnology

Primitive tech

“Hi guys, welcome to my YouTube channel. Make sure you like and subscribe.”
This is the familiar opening patter of hundreds of fresh-faced YouTubers waving down the camera to their legions of fans.
However, in an altogether quieter corner of the site, millions of people are watching a silent man banging rocks and sticks together.
Welcome to the world of primitive technology videos.
What is ‘primitive technology’?
Primitive technology is a genre of YouTube videos that demonstrate – usually over the course of about 15 minutes – how to build things without any influence from the modern world.
This is distinct from the “prepper” movement, which focuses on stockpiling weapons and resources in anticipation of the breakdown of society.
Primitive technology is more than just survival skills. It’s like hitting the reset button and seeing how advanced you could become if left to fend for yourself.
Need an axe? Make one from a stone and a branch. Need a pot? Mix your own clay and make a kiln. Need to crush some rocks? Make a water-powered hammer.
From Robinson Crusoe almost 300 years ago to Tom Hanks in the film Cast Away, the idea of surviving alone in the wild still captures the imagination of many.
Primitive technology videos regularly receive millions of views and have spawned an active online community who discuss the latest videos.
The trend seems to have begun with the eponymous Primitive Technology YouTube channel, established in 2015.
The channel has had more than 600 million views, with the most popular individual video having been viewed more than 54 million times.
The video shows a man in blue shorts – known as “The Man” – silently constructing a hut with a tiled roof and, in a flourish of ingenuity, under-floor heating.

Source: BBC
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